Bible Rebinding

This Bible needs a new cover.Question: I’m interested in having my personal Bible rebound in leather. What are my options?

Answer: First, we need to evaluate the binding of your Bible.

If it has an intact, sewn binding, we can go straight to talking about what leather you’d like. If the pages are falling out or the was originally only glued, we usually need to insert cords into the spine, to repair it and secure the pages first.  Check out our blog post to learn more about this.

Click here to go straight to our rebinding categories and see what we can do for you, or read on to learn more.

Never Bonded Leather! The leather used for the standard hand-held, take-to-Bible-study, on-the-go Bible must be durable. This is why we use genuine leathers for Bibles, never bonded leather. Common bonded leather can be as little as 70% leather fibers and 30% “bonding agent,” and it will fall apart when handled much. Even the softest genuine leather will have a longer life expectancy. See our video about leather and its strength.

Not all leathers are suitable for Bibles, but we stock an assortment of recommended Bible leathers, including pigskin, cowhide, English calfskin, various goatskins, lambskin (soft but better for a smaller Bible), and even kangaroo (better for a larger Bible). Many leathers also come in several grains, both natural and impressed. We mostly use leathers in the 1.75 to 2.75 oz. range.

The most economical is pigskin, which is commonly used on Bibles in natural and pressed grains. In most cases, Bibles which say “genuine leather” are covered in a pigskin. It’s sturdy and dependable. The most common grain is mission grain, which is mostly linear, like a grained calfskin. A natural grain shows visible pores. It’s easy for pigskin to become too stiff when rebinding, but we can use a special fiber interior liner — the part sandwiched in between the leather and the end pages — that keeps the cover flexible.

This is a really classy look for pigskin -- a grain that resembles goatskinPigskin doesn't have to be stiff.







Goatskin is often a preferred leather, because of its grain and luster. We use an unembossed soft-tanned premium goatskin, which is incredibly soft and durable. We have black (pictured), pearl, medium brown (chocolate or tobacco), and glossy chocolate, along with some other bright colors like turquoise, red, green, and pink.

For the older Bibles, such as the ones with the wide overhanging flaps like your grandmother kept on her nightstand, we are currently using this soft-tanned goatskin to recreate the original look. Often the pages have been torn and taped and sections are falling out.

While we can’t turn your keepsake Bible into a new Bible, we can usually get things back together so that the Bible can once again be used or at least passed on to the next generation in reasonable condition, complete with all the underlinings and notes in the margins.







The most durable is kangaroo, which is known to have the highest tensile strength of any leather on the market. But overall, the cost of the leather is not related to its strength as much as it is to its availability. All of our leathers are durable. Pictured here is our special Australian Outback Bible.


The above is not a complete list of your options — it’s just a short sampling.  But whether your Bible is old or brand new, we will do our best to guide you through the choices of leathers, grains, and colors and find something that works for you. Click here to go straight to our categories and learn more about what we can do for you.

We are also aware that there are some folks who just don’t like using animal hides for their Bibles. For this reason, we have imitation leather. This is actually a type of cloth with a leatherlike finish and comes in several grains. While it may not last as long as genuine leather, it will not disintegrate like bonded leather, and it can be imprinted and used for either a hardcover Bible or a softcover. Also available are a variety of standard bookbinding cloths suitable for indoor use with hardcover Bibles. See our Budget Menu.

Once your Bible is neatly dressed in its new skin, we can add ribbons and personalize it with your name or initials, so it doesn’t accidentally get picked up by the wrong person. Check our ordering information page for more on pricing.

E-Mail us and see what we can do for you! Or click here for a free quote.

If your Bible just needs a facelift, but not a brand-new cover, click here and read on.

If you have a large family Bible that needs restoration work, we can help with that, too.

After your Bible has been given a new lease on life, please refer to our post-op instructions.

Go ahead and ask. Our quotes are free, no obligation.